Energy Datapalooza 2012

So I thought I’d talk about my recent trip to Washington D.C. to attend the Energy Datapalooza conference. First thing I noticed in D.C. was this: the Metro system there is really nice. I mean really, really, nice. Cleveland’s RTA system could surely take a leaf out of D.C.’s book when it comes to the cleanliness of its stations.But I digress, the conference was very interesting. It started out like this: waking up at 6 in the morning and trying to not to look like a zombie. Getting to the conference was easy (see above: the Metro there is nice!).

Who is that dashing young man on the left? Oh! Thats me!

Ok ok, the conference. It started out with some really great talks, I especially enjoyed the one by the Found and CEO of WattzOn, Martha Amram. WattzOn has definitely got some good stuff going on, and a new app they just released that helps you choose new appliances that are both low-cost and energy efficient. There were quite a few good talks, and then Secretary of Energy, Dr. Steven Chu, gave a great speech on how there is such a large market of energy related applications that are just waiting to be developed.

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Oh, and you see the back of that kid’s head on the right side of the video? Thats me too!

There was also an award ceremony for the Apps For Energy contestants, where we were invited onto the stage to shake Dr. Steven Chu’s hand and get our picture taken.

Ok, so after all the presentations, we went up to the 4th? floor and setup our table. I think we took the prize for the most screens on a single table, 2 phones, two tablets, and my laptop (my gorgeous Retina Macbook Pro). Various people walked around checking out the displays. I got to talk with a lot of people and demonstrate our application. Even Martha Amram (WattzOn) stopped by and gave me her business card (which I was excited about). We definitely got some great feedback, so now its a matter of incorporating those suggestions into our application and releasing an update. When your one of two programmers, that can definitely take some time, but I’m working on it!

 

Update 10/8/2012:

Another video surfaced about the Energy Datapalooza.
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Energy Datapalooza

It’s hard to believe that only a few months ago, my team and I won second prize in the Student Division of the Apps For Energy Contest. It still hasn’t quite sunken in yet… we won a national competition….that is just amazing. One of my teammates was talking about it to a friend during a car ride (late Chinese food run), and she was totally amazed. Me?… I was amazed at her amazement. Did my team really just place in this national competition? I still feel like the same person. The whole thing just seems so surreal, like it was all a dream.

As a winning team, we have been invited to Washington D.C. to attend the “Energy Datapalooza”, with a booth demonstrating our application. I just got this in the mail, which drives home the impressiveness of what my team has achieved. I’m really proud of my team, but we have a lot more to accomplish before we can rest.

ENERGY DATAPALOOZA
Unleashing the power of data to advance our energy futureThe White House Office of Science and Technology Policy, Council on Environmental Quality, the U.S. Department of Energy, and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency cordially invite you to join us for an “Energy Datapalooza,” highlighting innovators and entrepreneurs who are using freely available data from the government and other sources to build products, services, and apps that advance a secure and clean energy future.

Monday, October 1, 2012
8:30 am – 2:00 pm

Eisenhower Executive Office Building
South Court Auditorium
Washington, D.C.

Special Guests:

Steven Chu
U.S. Secretary of Energy

Todd Park
Assistant to the President
U.S. Chief Technology Officer

Bob Perciasepe
Deputy Administrator, EPA

Nancy Sutley
Chair, White House Council on Environmental Quality

Heather Zichal
Deputy Assistant to the President for Energy and Climate Change

Setting the nofile limit in upstart

While working on a Java project that executes multiple sub processes, I found it necessary to increase to the file descriptor limit. By default, processes spawned in Ubuntu had a limit of 1024 open files, but changing that limit via ulimit or by /etc/security/limits.conf had no effect. I discovered that changes in /etc/security/limits.conf (and subsequently /etc/pam.d/common-session ) are only applied to process spawned by a login shell. Programs that launch on startup via “upstart” do not get these limits applied to them. Thankfully, upstart provides the limit stanza that allows you to modify some of these parameters, including the maximum number of open files. To see the limits on process, grab its PID, and cat /proc/<<PID>>/limits

The following is an example of increase the maximum number of open files to 4096 for a given upstart job:

limit nofile 4096 4096

You can checkout the full set of limit options at: http://upstart.ubuntu.com/wiki/Stanzas#limit

Note: Some of these limits (if not all) are transferred to any children that are forked by the parent

Check out upstart at: http://upstart.ubuntu.com/